Hybrid Courses

Advice from RWC faculty teaching Hybrid Courses
  • Add online elements incrementally rather than going totally F2F to totally online
  • Before the course starts, add info about attendance requirements on Blackboard under "Course Preview" or add the syllabus early.
  • Allow enough time for planning. You can't just stay a step ahead of the students.
  • Stay on top of grading--really easy to get behind. Schedule fixed grading blocks.
  • Rely on tech help. Watch for workshops, ask colleagues etc.
  • Make sure your online elements support your LEARNING OBJECTIVES rather than just showcase cool stuff.
  • Plan for Discussion Board grading beforehand. Post a sample posting to show your expectations. Create and share a rubric.
  • Check student email daily and respond promptly.
  • Watch your TONE. Avoid sarcasm and jokiness. Be warmer than you think is necessary.
  • Design elements for re-usability other quarters, e.g., don't embed dates etc.


Two of the 2009-2010 Course Redesign Seminars being offered by the CET&L are geared toward online or partially online courses. See the description for times and more information.

Resources
This document describes important considerations for designing a Hybrid Course.

10 Questions to consider when redesigning a course as a hybrid.

Hybrid courses, obstacles and solutions.

An overview of Hybrids can be found here: //Introduction to Hybrid Courses//
Smeaton's collection of articles regarding Hybrid Course effectiveness:


Student Readiness for Online Learning
An Online Learning Readiness Test.
Another example of a readiness test can be found and modified from this document.


Another approach to Readiness besides the self-assessment is to use a skills-based approach by assigning a variety of low-point-value tasks before the class or at the first class meeting. To see an example of this approach, entitled the Student Online Readiness Training Module, click on this link: http://screencast.com/t/szfpXCMD8 or contact Ann Witham at ann.witham@uc.edu

Frank Wray uses extensive video tutorials for his blackboard assignments. You can view and use these sample videos if you have Flash.